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Colin de Grandhomme retired, but whose loss is it anyway?

Colin de Grandhomme retired, but whose loss is it anyway
4.9/5 - (13 votes)

Colin de Grandhomme retired? Many have made lasting headlines in the great game of cricket, especially the all rounders. You can’t get over what Sir Sobers achieved. You relish what Jacques Henry Kallis managed in a long long stint at the highest level.

You are keenly following the career of Ben Stokes just as you followed Andrew Flintoff’s.

You mourned Andrew Symonds’ passing.

But what do you do with Colin de Grandhomme? How do you analyse a career that had so much potential but maybe not the legs to go the long way?

The broad shouldered, bruising Kiwi has been one of the most talented, if not the most widely successful cricketers to embrace the sport in recent times.

And he did so with an unfazed dedication that cared little for shenanigans and had everything in the world to do with quiet focus.

It was just the thing that made Colin de Grandhomme- 29 Tests, 45 ODIs and 41 T20Is- against his name stand out.

Which was impressive because how can one stand out despite not featuring in fifty contests in any format of Cricket?

But this was Colin de Grandhomme, the man behind the long mane and the long numbers in Test match cricket; his unbeaten 120 against the Proteas kept New Zealand in the fight in a contest where there was little left to play except pride.

At the Hagley Oval, South Africans belted hosts New Zealand on way to a 198-run win.

Only de Grandhomme’s workhorse like dedication and sturdiness with the bat stood out for the Tom Latham side.

But if it could be said, Colin de Grandhomme’s most memorable- if not the greatest- cricketing moment came during the Kiwis’ win over India in the World Test Championship final of 2021.

His contribution was that of 13 runs off thirty deliveries in what obviously was a five over stay at the Rosebowl wicket.

But then a passerby does not use every tree as a spot under which one can rest; there are some whose very presence lends an air of calm and grace.

As did Colin de Grandhomme’s, whom none sledged, none derided and one absolutely didn’t hear back anything untoward from in all these years.

He was, and may remain, as a gentle but not exactly a giant of cricket, albeit a talent that had potential to achieve giant milestones.

What’s rather baffling, and that is actually the word in this context, is just how the lanky, good natured all rounder featured in only 74 contests (Tests +ODIs. That’s when he debuted back in 2012, which doing simple schoolboy math suggests is a decade in the sport’s top flight?

Did New Zealand under utilise him? Did Colin de Grandhomme under represent himself?

Regardless, it’ll always perturb perhaps the die-hard Kiwi- and we know them as the quiet ones who aren’t fanboys- that the right hander ends 1 shy of 50 Test wickets.

In some ways, de Grandhomme also represented a changing cricketing culture, where a lot was saved for shorter league games and franchise series’ and maybe not so much for national duties after all.

Which is why it makes sense to view the big hitting powerfully-built right hander call time on a career that could have perhaps been better utilised instead of experiencing tremors called “workload” management.

The nice-natured batting all rounder had to plead to the cricket board of New Zealand to release him after a lavish deal with BBL attracted Colin de Grandhomme’s attention.

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Regardless, it is a loss in a sense to that public that loved seeing Corey Anderson but had to deal with the powerful talent wielding the mic, not the cricket bat. It’s a sort of blow to that audience that has to see a horribly underrated and perhaps even underachieving Jimmy Neesham, who gladly is still around.

But maybe it’s not a heartbreaking moment after all for one to deal with de Grandhomme’s international retirement from Black Caps duties.