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Cricket Tips and Tricks to Improve your Cricket Skills

Cricket Tips and Tricks to Improve your Cricket Skills

Game of Cricket

Cricket Tips and Tricks: Cricket is not just a bat-and-ball game but it’s a emotion. Passion for cricket is huge in young India. If you love cricket, You can learn using these tips and tricks​

Cricket Tips and Tricks

Cricket is not just a game – It’s an Emotion

Cricket is not just a game it’s a emotion: Discover ways to get the most out of your talent in cricket. There are ways to improve your cricket batting and bowling style and success rate through these tips and tricks.

Improve our cricket playing tips, tricks, techniques with batting, bowling, and fielding tips from the International Cricketers.

It’s not just giving training for the players but also it is good to learn for the cricket passionate people like fans, commentators, bloggers to have complete knowledge about cricket.

This is going to help for cricket viewers/fans/passionate people to have a healthy discussion about Cricket and Cricket batting tips for Beginners, intermediate and experienced cricketers to move from best to the better cricketer

Cricket Tips and Tricks

Introduction to Cricket

Cricket is a bat and ball game played between two teams with 11 players on each side.

It is ideally played in a large oval field with a 66-foot, hardened playing surface, or pitch, in the center.

A wicket, made of 3 wooden stumps and a pair of wooden bails, is set up on either end of the pitch and a crease is drawn 122 cms in front of the wickets.

The field to the left of a right-handed batsman is called the leg side or on side, and the field to their right is called the off side.

A game consists of two innings separated by a break.

During the first innings, one team scores runs by batting, while the other stops runs from being scored and takes wickets by bowling and fielding.

You can check out the video on the ‘different ways a batsman can get out’ In the second innings, the fielding side from the first innings have to bat and chase the score set by their opponents, while the batting team from the first innings defends their total by bowling and fielding.

You can check out the video on how to score runs.

When the game is in play the batting team waits outside the field, except for two among them who are sent in to score runs.

The striker defends their wicket from the bowler’s delivery, while the non-striker waits behind the bowler’s crease, ready to run between the wickets to take runs.

The bowlers in the fielding side take turn to bowl sets of six deliveries, known as overs.

They deliver each ball from behind the bowling crease, aiming to hit the wicket on the striker’s end of the pitch.

You can check out the video on ‘introduction to bowling’.

The fielders, meanwhile, spread themselves out on the field to stop the ball struck by the batsmen and return it to the wicket.

They work together to obstruct the batsmen from scoring runs and try to get them out one by one, until 10 wickets have been lost or all overs have been bowled.

If the team batting second manages to exceed the total score set by their opponents, they win the game.

If both teams have scored the same number of runs at the end of the game, the result is a tie.

As you watch and play more cricket, the rules will become more clear to you.

Enjoy your game.

How to Score Runs

In cricket all runs are scored while a team is batting. The three basic ways to score runs are: running between the wickets, boundaries and extras. The most common way to score runs in cricket is for the striker to hit the ball with the bat and for both batsmen to run between the wickets, exchanging ends of the pitch.

 

Each time they successfully make contact with the opposite end of the pitch, one run is awarded to the striker. When the ball is hit past the boundary line, having first made contact with the ground, the striker scores four runs. 

An airborne shot past the boundary line earns the batsman six runs. A bye run is scored when the delivery makes no contact with the batsman or their bat and rushes past the wicket keeper, allowing enough time to run between the wickets.

If such a ball crosses the boundary line, a bye results in four runs to the batting side. If the ball hits the batsman’s body instead of their bat, any runs scored are counted as leg byes. Errors in a delivery can also result in runs being awarded to the batting team’s score.

Common causes of a No Ball include delivering a full toss above the striker’s waist and stepping over the bowling crease while releasing the ball. A Wide Ball is a delivery that travels wide of where the batsman is standing as well as their initial stance, preventing them from attempting a normal stroke.

 

At the end of an innings, the individual scores of all the batsmen in a team are added together, along with all extras. The winning team is the one with the higher total.

Enjoy your game.

The Different Ways to Get Out in Cricket

In cricket, there are several ways for a batsman to lose their wicket.

Here are some of the more common ways to get dismissed.

If the bowler’s delivery manages to hit the batsman’s wicket and knock down the bails, the batsman is bowled out.

If a batsman hits the ball and it is caught by a player from the fielding side before it hits the ground, the batsman is caught out.

When the batsman steps out of their crease to play the ball, the wicket keeper, who stands behind the stumps, can knock down the bails with the ball in hand and get the batsman stumped out.

To be safe, the batsman must have some part of themself or their bat behind the crease while the ball is in play.

If the batsman hits the wicket with their own body or bat, whether by accident or on purpose, they are out “hit wicket”.

When the bowler bowls a straight delivery that is in the right line and length to hit the wicket, but the batsman’s pads are in the way, the bowler can appeal for a leg before wicket, or LBW, if the umpire agrees that the ball would have hit the stumps.

When two batsmen are running between the stumps to score runs, if a fielder manages to knock down the bails before the batsman running towards the wicket reaches the crease, then that batsman is run out.

The batsman can also retire out, due to injury, illness or any other unavoidable circumstance.

In this case the batsman may resume their innings with the consent of the opposite captain.

Keep playing cricket to get a better understanding of the game.

Enjoy your game.

The Role of the Umpire in Cricket

The first umpire stands behind the stumps at the bowler’s end for a straight view down the pitch.

A second umpire may stand near square leg, for a closer view of the play to provide consultation.

Let’s look at the key decisions made by an umpire and the signals thy must use to indicate them.

In dismissals like a leg before wicket, an appeal has to be made by the fielding team, when they think that the batsman is out.

The umpire signals the decision by raising an index finger above the head if the batsman is out.

A No Ball is indicated by holding an arm out horizontally and shouting “no-ball” A free hit is awarded the following delivery by by making circular movements in the air with one raised hand.

The batsman would generally take the risk of going for a six as a dismissal would not count.

A Wide Ball is signalled by extending both arms out horizontally and a call of Wide Ball.

If the ball is no longer in play, it is considered a dead ball.

The umpire signals this by crossing and uncrossing their wrists below the waist and calls out Dead Ball.

If the batsman hits a four, the umpire waves their right arm from side to side at shoulder height.

A sixer is signalled by the umpire raising both hands above their head.

To indicate a bye, the umpire holds up one open palm above the head.

If runs are counted as leg byes, they are signalled by the umpire touching their raised knee.

If either of the batsmen turns for a second run without grounding their person or bat behind the crease, it is called a short run and not added to the score.

If more than one run was taken then the umpire decides how many count.

A short run is signalled by the umpire tapping their near shoulder with the fingers.

Often for close run out calls, the umpire can refer to the thrid umpire for a slow-motion video referral.

If the umpire realises they have made an incorrect signal, they may be revoked by crossing both arms across their chest, before making the corrected signal.

When a Power play is beginning, the umpire moves their arm in circular movement in front.

Enjoy your game.

Fielding Positions in Cricket

This blog is for cricket lovers to get the knowledge of Fielding Positions in the game of Cricket. There are many cricket fans across the globe but very few of them know about better fielding positions.

A guide to where fielders are placed

Learning fielding positions is important whether you are a player or a spectator. Players need to know where they are being placed by the captain and spectators can enhance their enjoyment, particularly if they are listening to Test Match Special on the radio. Only nine fielding positions can be used at any given time since the bowler and wicket-keeper are fixed positions.

List of fielding positions

  • Wicket Keeper
  • First Slip

  • Second slip

  • Third Slip

  • Fly Slip

  • Long Stop

  • Third man

  • Gully

  • Deep Gully

  • Silly Point

  • Point

  • Deep Point

  • Cover Sweeper

  • Cover Point

  • Extra Cover

  • Deep Extra Cover

  • Silly Mid Off

  • Mid Off

  • Long Off

  • Straight Hit

  • Silly Mid On

  • Mid On

  • Long On

  • Forward Short Leg

  • Short Mid Wicket

  • Mid Wicket

  • Deep Mid Wicket

  • Sweeper

  • Short Square Leg

  • Square Leg

  • Deep Square Leg

  • Leg Gully

  • Long Leg

  • Leg Slip

  • Short Fine Leg

  • Deep Fine Leg

Working out the cricket fielding positions

Most of the positions are named roughly according to a system of polar coordinates…

One word (Leg, Cover, Mid-wicket) specifies the angle from the batsman, and is optionally preceded by an adjective describing the distance from the batsman (silly, short, deep or long).

  • Leg refers to the Leg side which is the side of the batsman’s leg
  • On refers to the On side which is batsman’s leg side too
  • Off refers to the batsman’s off side which is the opposite of the leg side

Distances of the fielding positions from the batsman are described as:

  • Silly is very close
  • Short is quite close
  • Mid is a mid point to the boundary
  • Long and Deep are closer to the boundary

The angle from the batsmen are described as:

  • Square is along an imaginary extension of the popping crease
  • Backward behind square and the batsmen
  • Forward in front of square and the batsmen
  • Fine closer to an extension of an imaginary line along the middle of the pitch bisecting the stumps
  • Wide further from an extension of an imaginary line along the middle of the pitch bisecting the stumps

Cricket Tips and Tricks | Batting

Learn the Grip and Stance in Cricket

When batting, the way in which you grip the bat and the stance with which you wait for the delivery both guide how ready you are to face the ball.

The 2 key steps are the grip and the stance.

Make a V-shape between the thumb and forefinger of your dominant hand and align its point with the ridge on the back of the blade.

Do the same with your non-dominant hand, but with the v-shape aligned slightly towards the outside edge.

For a right-handed batsman, the left hand should be above the right hand both positioned close together.

Take your guard by marking the line where the stump of your choice would intersect the crease.

In this case it is the middle stump.

Get into a side on stance with your feet about a foot apart on either side of the popping crease and apply weight on the balls of your feet.

Bend your knees just enough so that you are ready to spring forward or step back.

Tap the bat behind your back foot so that you’re aware of your relative position to the wicket.

Make sure you don’t lean on your bat when you ground it.

Hold your head steady with the eyes levelled and facing the bowler.

It is essential that you are comfortable and relaxed with your batting grip and stance.

Don’t forget to watch the next video on the back-lift and footwork.

Enjoy your game through these Cricket Tips and Tricks! Happy Cricketing!

Learn the Backlift and Footwork in Batting

The two key steps are: the backlift and the footwork.

The backlift helps create momentum to power your shot through.

As the bowler approaches their end of the pitch, roll your front shoulder forward and raise up your bat behind you, getting ready to swing it towards the ball.

If you raise the bat towards the inside of the stumps, your body gets in the way of strokes played to the leg side.

For efficient footwork, slightly flex your knees to bring your weight onto the balls of your feet, getting ready to move your body in response to the ball.

To play a front foot shot, transfer your weight by taking a step forward.

Open the angle of the toe to play a shot to the leg side, or close the angle for a shot to the offside.

You can also play off your back foot by taking a step back.

If needed, you can also step out to the pitch of the ball.

Step forward with the front foot, followed by the back foot and front foot in quick succession.

Effective footwork will help you move your head, and therefore your center of gravity, towards the line of delivery.

Enjoy your game through these Cricket Tips and Tricks! Happy Cricketing!

How to Play a Front Foot Defence in Batting

As a shot that simply blocks the ball, the front-foot or forward defence is helpful while getting used to the pitch.

Any well-pitched delivery headed towards the stumps is a perfect opportunity to play the front foot defence.

The three key steps are the position, the shot and the follow through.

Relax your body and assume a balanced stance with your eyes level.

Step towards the pitch of the ball with a bent front knee and transfer your weight by leaning forward.

With a short back swing, or none at all, make contact directly below your eyes.

Remember that a gap between your bat and pad creates the risk of getting bowled.

Keep the bat angled down to avoid getting caught and play against the line of the delivery.

If the ball is heading outside off stump, step slightly across the crease and hit the ball with a straight face towards the ground.

Keep practicing the stroke to perfect your front foot defense.

Enjoy your game through these Cricket Tips and Tricks! Happy Cricketing!

How to Play a Back Foot Defence

The back foot defence is played to block the ball rather than to score runs.

It is usually played to a fast delivery that falls short of good length and rises to the stumps with a high bounce.

The three key steps in a batting stroke are: getting into position, hitting the shot and following through.

Relax your body and assume a balanced stance with your eyes level.

Move your back foot towards the stump and shift your front foot to meet the back foot.

Raise your front elbow and swing the bat with its face angled down so the ball pitches right in front of you.

Hold your position instead of following through and hit the ball down with a relaxed grip.

Keep practicing the stroke to perfect your Back Foot Defence.

Enjoy your game through these Cricket Tips and Tricks! Happy Cricketing!

How to Play a Straight Drive

The straight drive is played on the front foot by easing the ball back in the opposite direction to the delivery.

An overpitched delivery to the middle or off stump is the perfect opportunity to play the straight drive.

The three key steps are: the position, the shot and the follow through.

Relax your body and assume a balanced stance.

Raise your bat with a high back swing.

Step forward with your front foot landing close to the pitch of the ball and toes in line with the delivery.

Bend your front knee and lean your weight forward.

Present the bowler with the straight face of the bat continuing upward in an arc.

Work with your top hand, leading with the elbow, and lend support with your bottom hand.

If the ball is pitching in good length, you can step out to drive it forward along the ground.

You can also roll your wrist to let the bat continue in an arc over your front shoulder.

Keep practicing the stroke to perfect your Straight Drive.

Enjoy your game through these Cricket Tips and Tricks! Happy Cricketing!

How to Play an Off Drive

An off drive is a vertical stroke played on the front foot to hit the ball wide of mid-off.

The right ball to play the off drive is an over-pitched delivery falling on or outside of off stump.

The three key steps are: getting into position, hitting the shot and following through.

Relax your body and assume a balanced stance.

Raise your bat with a high backswing towards fine leg to gain momentum for your shot.

Leading with your head and front shoulder, place your front foot forward, towards where the ball is pitching.

Swing the bat vertically with its face forward and play the shot close to your front foot.

Break the position of your wrist to let the bat continue in an arc over your front shoulder.

Keep practicing the stroke to perfect your off drive.

Enjoy your game through these Cricket Tips and Tricks! Happy Cricketing!

How to Play an On Drive

The on drive is played by striking the ball off the front foot towards mid-on.

An overpitched delivery on the leg stump presents the perfect opportunity to play the on drive.

The three key steps are: the position, the shot and the follow through.

Relax your body and assume a balanced stance.

Transfer your weight onto your front foot and lean forward so your head is above your bent front knee.

Raise your bat with a high back swing in the direction of third man and power your shot forward.

Swing the bat with a strong top hand and let it continue in its arc towards the sky.

Keep practicing the stroke to perfect your on drive.

Enjoy your game through these Cricket Tips and Tricks! Happy Cricketing!

How to Play a Cover Drive

The cover drive is a stroke played off the front foot by hitting the ball with a near-vertical arc and driving it along the ground towards the gap between cover and extra cover.

The perfect opportunity to play the cover drive is an overpitched delivery headed outside off stump.

The three key steps are: the position, the shot and the follow through.

Relax your body and assume a balanced stance.

Raise your bat with a high back swing to gain enough momentum to play the shot.

Maintan a straight bat and strike the ball below your head with a high front elbow.

Avoid hitting the ball too soon or it may loft up in the air to be caught by the fielder.

Complete the shot with your weight moving behind it and the face of the bat reaching skyward along the line of the shot.

Keep practicing to perfect your cover drive.

Enjoy your game through these Cricket Tips and Tricks! Happy Cricketing!

How to Play a Square Drive

The square drive is a front foot stroke played by hitting the ball ‘square’ of the wicket towards backward point or cover.

An overpitched ball outide the off stump is the perfect opportunity to play the square drive.

The three key steps are: the position, the shot and the follow through.

Relax your body and assume a balanced stance.

Raise your bat with a high back swing to gain enough momentum to play the shot.

Lead your weight towards the shot with your head, turning your front shoulder so your back is slightly visible to the bowler.

Take your front foot towards the pitch of the ball and bend your front knee to play the shot close to your body.

Drive the ball with a slightly horizontal arc and open face, making contact at shin level.

Complete the stroke letting your bat continue in an arc over your shoulder.

Keep practicing the stroke to perfect your square drive.

Enjoy your game through these Cricket Tips and Tricks! Happy Cricketing!

How to Play a Lofted Drive

The lofted drive is a front foot shot in which the bat is swung earlier in order to drive the ball up in the air between mid on and mid off.

It is best played to an over-pitched delivery when played from the crease.

The three key steps are: the position, the shot and the follow through.

Relax your body and assume a balanced stance.

Raise your bat with a high back swing to gain enough momentum to play the shot.

Taking a step towards the pitch of the ball, bend your front knee keeping your head behind the point of contact.

Strike the ball a foot or two in front, chipping it in the air and over the bowler.

Fully extend your arms in an arc towards the direction of the shot and release your back foot to find your balance.

Keep practicing the stroke to perfect your Lofted Drive.

Enjoy your game through these Cricket Tips and Tricks! Happy Cricketing!

How to Play a Square Cut

A square cut is a a cross-batted stroke played off the back foot to place the ball square of the wicket or slightly backward of point.

The perfect delivery for a square cut is a short pitched ball travelling wide of off stump, allowing free movement of the arm.

The three key steps are: the position, the shot and the follow through using Cricket Tips and Tricks.

Relax your body and get into a balanced, side-on stance gaining enough backlift to feed power to your the shot.

Get behind and over the ball by taking a step towards off stump with your toe facing point.

Transfer your bodyweight onto the ball of your back foot, and lean your head towards the line of the ball.

Swing the bat across from a higher to a lower plane with extended arms as the ball draws to your side and roll your wrists to hit it along the ground.

Complete the stroke, bringing the bat over your shoulder, maintaining a balanced stance.

Keep practicing the stroke to perfect your square cut.

Enjoy your game.

How to Play a Late Cut

A late cut is a cross-batted stroke typically played off the back foot by slicing the ball towards third man.

The perfect delivery for a late cut is a short pitched ball travelling wide of off stump.

The three key steps are: the position, the shot and the follow through.

Relax your body and get into a balanced, side-on stance and raise the bat over your back shoulder.

Step towards the off stump with a slightly bent back leg and apply your weight on the ball of your back foot.

Lean your head towards the line of the ball to play the shot close to your body and cut the ball at the very last moment to deflect it wide of the keeper’s reach.

Roll your wrists gently following through with the slicing movement.

Keep practicing the stroke to perfect your cut shot.

Enjoy your game.

How to Play a Leg Glance

The leg glance can be played on the front or the back foot by deflecting the ball square or behind the wicket on the leg side.

The perfect opportunity to play a leg glance is an overpitched delivery headed on or outside the leg stump.

The three key steps are: the position, the shot and the follow through.

Relax your body and get into a balanced, side-on stance.

Raise your bat with a backlift pointing towards first slip in order to create space for an arc swinging towards the legside.

Take a short step towards the pitch of the ball and lean forward with your head and front shoulder, transfering your weight onto a bent front knee.

You can also play the shot off the backfoot to a more overpitched delivery.

Swing your bat down alongside your pad, roll your wrists to close the face of the bat and use the pace of the ball to glance it to the leg side, wide of the keeper.

Complete the stroke by naturally continuing the rolling movement of the bat.

Keep practicing the with Cricket Tips and Tricks for stroke to perfect your leg glance.

Enjoy your game.

How to Play a Flick Shot

The flick shot relies on the wrists to redirect the ball to the leg side towards square leg or midwicket.

The perfect opportunity to play a flick shot is a a full-length delivery heading towards middle or leg stump.

The three key steps are: the position, the shot and the follow through.

Get into a side on stance with your weight distributed on the balls of your feet and your eyes level.

Take a short step towards the ball, leaning with your head slightly outside its line, and shift your weight into the shot.

Swing your arms in a downward arc as if playing an on drive and clip the ball off your legs by closing the face of the bat with a roll of your wrists.

Complete the stroke, with your hips rotating as you pivot on your front foot and let your bat continue naturally in its rolling motion.

Keep practicing the stroke to perfect your Flick shot.

Enjoy your game.

How to Play a Pull Shot

The pull shot is an attacking shot played off the back foot by hitting the ball from outside the bodyline and onto the on side, past midwicket.

The perfect opportunity to play the pull shot is a short pitched delivery reaching up between the chest and waist level of the batsman.

It is also a useful stroke to execute on a full toss.

The three key steps are: the position, the shot and the follow through.

Get into a side on stance with your weight distributed on the ball of either feet, raising your bat with a high back swing.

Apply weight on your front foot as you take a step towards off stump to get inside the line of the ball and pivot on the ball of your backfoot.

Let your bottom hand power the stroke as you swing the bat across to the leg side with fully extended arms.

Roll your wrists to keep the ball on the ground and bring the bat over your front shoulder.

Remember to steer clear of the ball if it is approaching towards the body line.

Keep practicing the stroke to perfect your pull shot.

Enjoy your game.

How to Play a Sweep Shot

The sweep shot is a crossed-batted, front foot shot played to the leg side, typically towards square leg or fine leg.

It is usually played to a low bouncing ball of good length falling on or outside the leg stump.

The three key steps are: the position, the shot and the follow through.

Assume a balanced side-on stance, creating enough backlift on the bat to power your shot.

Lean in towards the line of the ball with your head and front shoulder, getting your front foot as close to the pitch of the ball as possible.

Placing your front pad inside the line of the ball, bend your front leg as you let your back leg collapse.

With your head leaning out above the front foot and just outside the front knee, bring the bat down and across from the high backswing.

Present as much of the face of the bat as possible to the point of impact and roll your wrists to keep the ball grounded.

Finish with the bat in a high position or over your shoulder with your hands close to the front shoulder.

If the bowler spots your footwork and tries to bowl a quicker short ball, be ready to shift back onto your back foot and defend the ball.

Remember that a slight misjudgement can send the ball in the air or lead to a LBW.

Keep practicing the stroke to perfect your sweep shot.

Enjoy your game.

How to Play a Reverse Sweep

The reverse sweep is a cross-batted shot played to create space behind square on the off side.

It is usually played to a full-pitched delivery in line with the off stump.

The three key steps are: the position, the grip and the shot.

Aligning your head, front shoulder and front foot with the ball, take a comfortable step forward and bend both knees.

Bring your bat out in front, across and over your front knee as you shift the grip of your bottom hand around the handle just enough so the blade is facing off side.

With your head above your front knee, swing the bat from the leg-side to the off-side, slightly closing the face of the bat to keep the ball grounded.

Play the reverse sweep to throw a predictable bowler off from a consistent line and length.

Time your shot well to avoid getting into trouble with a leg before wicket or getting bowled out.

Keep practicing the stroke to perfect your reverse sweep.

Enjoy your game.

How to Play a Back Foot Punch

The Back Foot Punch is an attacking shot played off the back foot by driving the ball forward between mid-off and extra cover.

It is generally played to a short pitched delivery falling on or outside off stump.

The three key steps are: the position, the shot and the follow through.

Relax your body and assume a balanced stance.

Taking a short step towards the off stump with your back foot, raise your bat with a high back swing and dip your head and front shoulder.

Transfer your weight onto the ball of the back foot and shift your front foot next to your back foot.

Swing the bat down using a high front elbow and punch the bat forward with your bottom hand, positioning your head above the ball.

Let the face of your bat continue in the direction of the shot.

Keep practicing the stroke to perfect your back foot punch.

Enjoy your game.

Cricket Tips and Tricks | Bowling

Introduction to Bowling

In cricket, the game is only in play once bowlers begin their run up to bowl to the batsman.

The bowler bowls six balls, collectively known as an over.

Deliveries fall into short pitched deliveries, good or full length deliveries or overpitched deliveries.

The length determines how high the ball is when it reaches the batsman.

The line of the ball may be aimed on and outside the leg stump, towards middle stump, or on and outside the off stump.

The bowler may attempt to force the batsman to play certain shots to create errors in judgement.

The chief objective is to get the batsman out by the conceding minimal runs in the process.

Just as a batsman is always looking to score runs, the bowler is on the lookout for dot balls and wickets.

The two primary categories of bowling are known as fast bowling and spin bowling.

Fast bowlers generally take longer run-ups and bowl straight and fast deliveries.

Spinners tend to a few paces before they deliver a slow paced ball that turns after the bounce.

Practice all variations and find the one that works best for you.

Enjoy your game.

How to Bowl in Cricket – Tips1

The four key steps are the grip, the approach, the delivery stride, and the follow through.

Hold the ball with the seam upright.

Place the index finger on one side and the middle finger on the other.

The thumb should grip the middle of the seam from beneath.

The ring and little fingers should be folded onto the palm.

To begin with, simply hold the ball and walk towards the bowling crease.

About 3 feet from the stumps start into a leaping motion by lifting up the leg on the side of your non bowling arm, with its knee and foot pointed straight ahead.

Position your bowling hand between your eye and the target, and raise your non bowling arm further up in the air.

Plant your back foot on the crease and swing your non-bowling arm down as you move your weight smoothly forward onto a stiff front leg.

Extend your bowling arm and swing it in an arc behind and over your shoulder, to release the ball from its highest point.

Lean forward and swing your bowling arm across your body and past the opposite waist.

A common mistake for beginners is to land on the same foot that they lept from.

Walk towards the stumps and keep practicing the leap, delivery and the follow through.

Enjoy your game.

How to Bowl in Cricket – Tips2

Check the video ‘How to Bowl – Part 1’ to get started on the basics of the motion.

The four key steps are: the run up, the leap and stride, the release and the follow through.

Before you begin, measure your run up by running away from the bowling crease starting with your toes over the line.

Take enough steps to build your momentum and leap off of your front foot, the one on the side of your non-bowling arm.

Land onto the back foot, the one on the side of your bowling arm and stride forward so the toes of your front foot steps on the crease.

Mark the starting position of your run up.

Start running straight ahead with small steps, a smooth rhythm and back-and-forth movement of the arms.

Accelerate and straighten your body as you approach the crease.

Around three metres from the wicket, spring off your front foot, and lift the back knee.

Take the leap, swinging your bowling arm clockwise until it is between your eyes and the target and the non-bowling arm raised even higher.

Land on your back foot and stride forward onto your front foot, making sure that it does not cross the crease.

Maintain a straight and stiff front knee so your trunk is thrown forward.

As you take the stride, swing your bowling arm anti-clockwise to the release position.

Simultaneously swing your non-bowling arm down and behind you.

Release the ball after your front foot lands and before following through onto your back foot.

Once you get the technique, aim to pitch the ball three feet ahead of the batsman.

Remember that if you release the ball early you will bowl an overpitched delivery.

If you release the ball late you will end up bowling short.

Enjoy your game.

How to Bowl Good Line

The line of a delivery refers to the path of the ball in the horizontal axis from the off side to the leg side of the batsman.

A good bowler needs to be able to maintain a consistent line to develop accuracy and to execute an effective strategy.

Line may include swing induced on the ball while it is in flight, as well as variations caused by spin during bounce.

Bowlers commonly aim the ball directly at the wicket in an attempt to get the batsman out bowled.

Fast bowlers may aim for the corridor of uncertainty on or just outside of off stump, as it is difficult to tell whether or not such a ball is likely to strike the stumps.

An alternate strategy is to concentrate the attack near the line of leg stump, aiming to cramp the batsman, forcing him play with the bat close to his body.

Variation in line is as important as consistency and is used to take the batsman by surprise.

When the ball is not close enough for the batsman to be able to hit it, it constitutes a wide ball.

Keep practicing to bowl a consistent line.

Enjoy your game.

How to Bowl Good Length

The distance before the wicket where the ball pitches is described as being short, good or full length.

A delivery of good length gets the batsman to hesitate over whether they should step back or forward as the ball could gain too much height for a safe shot along the ground.

It is usually about five steps from the batting crease at the point from where the ball bounces up to hit the bails.

If you take your delivery stride too soon, or try and bowl fast and release the ball late, you may end up bowling short of good length.

A full length or an overpitched delivery occurs when the ball is released early.

It lets the batsman drive the ball away comfortably.

A full toss is a ball that reaches the batsman without pitching.

A yorker pitches close to the feet of the batsmen making it difficult for them to play a shot.

Practice varying the length of the delivery to surprise the batsman.

Enjoy your game.

How to Bowl an Off Spin

The basic off spin, or off break, is bowled by generating a side spin on the ball that turns it into the right-handed batsman.

It is bowled with the arm on the outside of the ball, by turning it with a quick motion of mostly the fingers and some wrist.

The three key steps are: the grip, the run up and the delivery.

Grip the ball with the top knuckle of the index and middle fingers spread across the seam.

The little finger and thumb are usually tucked away to the side and the ring finger may be used for support.

Take about 5 steps to the bowling crease from a point slightly diagonal to the stumps You may also choose to bowl around the wicket to find the right angle.

As you reach the crease, spring into a coiled position and uncoil as you bring your front foot down on the crease.

Swing your bowling arm forward with your wrist hinged back.

Roll your wrist forward, over the top, turning the ball from the forefinger to ring finger, causing the ball to spin as it is released.

Aim the ball at a good length outside off stump, spinning it into the right-handed batsman.

Remember that if your bowl too close to the stumps, the batsman may hit the ball away into the leg side.

Keep practicing to perfect your off spin.

Enjoy your game.

How to Bowl a Leg Spin

The basic variation of the leg spin for a right handed bowler involves turning the ball from the on side of the right-handed batsman to the off side.

The three key steps are: the grip, the run up and the delivery.

When bowling leg spin, grip the ball with the top knuckles of the index, middle and ring fingers spread well across the seam.

The little finger and thumb are pushed away to the sides, though some bowlers may use the support of the thumb.

Start at a short distance from the stumps and get into your leap as you approach the crease.

Use a bent wrist as you bring the ball close to the release, rolling it over, so the palm of your hand finishes facing the sky.

The turn in the ball is generated by spinning the ball from your ring finger towards your index finger, sending the ball up in the air and towards the batsman.

The delivery should be pitched towards the leg stump, so that it spins towards the off stump.

Keep practicing to perfect your leg spin.

Enjoy your game.

How to Bowl an Off Cutter

The off cutter is a fast ball that turns into a right-handed batsman, often used by seam bowlers to get the ball to move when there is no help from the pitch.

It is bowled away towards the off stump and upon pitching, spins or cuts in towards the leg side, provided the ball lands on the seam or on rough surface.

The two key steps are the grip and the delivery.

To bowl an off cutter, grip the ball with your index finger on the seam and your middle finger a little away.

The thumb grips the ball from below.

Lock your wrist cocked backwards so the ball is released at the very last moment.

As you release, drag your fingers across the seam with a cutting motion down the right side of the ball.

Roll the ball out of your hand over your index finger, generating spin from left to right as it makes its way down the pitch.

Try pitching the Off Cutter on or outside off stump to a right-handed batsman at a good length.

This will hopefully get him to drive forward without expecting the turn into the stumps.

Keep practicing to perfect your off cutter .

Enjoy your game.

How to Bowl a Leg Cutter

The Leg Cutter is a fast ball that turns away from a right-handed batsman.

It swings in to leg stump and upon pitching, spins towards the off side.

The two key steps are the grip and the delivery.

To bowl a leg cutter, grip the ball with your middle finger on the seam and your index finger a little away on the left of the seam.

The thumb grips the ball from below.

Cock your wrist backwards so the ball is released at the very last moment.

As you release, drag your fingers across the seam with a cutting motion down the left side of the ball.

Roll the ball out of your hand over your ring and little fingers, generating spin from right to left as it makes its way down the pitch.

Try bowling the leg cutter outside the off stump to the right-handed batsman at a good length.

Since the cutter is a slower ball cloaked under a fast action, the deception may confuse the batsman into driving forward without expecting the change in line.

Keep practicing to perfect your leg cutter.

Enjoy your game.

How to Bowl an Inswinger

If bowled by a right-hander, it is a delivery that swings inside towards the body of a right handed batsman.

The two key steps are: the grip and the delivery.

Step 1. Grip the ball with the first two fingers close together on the seam, with the seam in a vertical position. The middle finger should rest firmly on the right edge of the seam and the index finger holding lightly the left edge.

The ring and little fingers should be folded onto the palm. The thumb should be on the seam underneath.

You should be able to slide a finger in between the palm and the ball.

Step 2. Angle the seam towards leg slip. Make sure that you angle the shiny half of the ball away from the batsman.

Run up to the batsman to bowl.

As you release the ball, cock your wrist and snap it to generate some extra pace.

Aim to bowl just outside the off-stump so that the ball swings towards the off or middle stump.

Practice bowling inswingers until you have good control over the swing. Enjoy your game.

How to Bowl an Outswinger

If bowled by a right-hander, it is a delivery that swings away from a right handed batsman.

The two key steps are: the grip and the delivery.

Grip the ball with the index and middle fingers close together on the seam, with the seam in a vertical position.

The ring and little fingers should be folded onto the palm.

The thumb should be on the seam underneath.

You should be able to slide a finger in between the palm and the ball.

Angle the seam towards the first slip.

Make sure that the shiny half of the ball is facing towards the batsman.

Run up to the batsman to bowl.

As you release the ball, cock your wrist and snap it to generate some extra pace.

Follow through with the bowling arm across the body.

Aim to bowl on the middle stump so that the ball swings away onto the off stump or just outside.

Practice bowling outswingers until you have good control over the swing.

Enjoy your game.

How to Bowl Finger Spin

Although it conventionally refers to the off spin, finger spin applies to a variety of deliveries that use the action of the fingers rather than the wrist to generate turn.

The three key steps are: the grip and the action, the leg spin variation and the off spin variation.

Place the first knuckle of your index and middle fingers on opposite sides of the seam and grip the ball tight using your thumb for support.

Walk towards the crease and get into your leap and stride action with your bowling arm comfortably close to the body, and release the ball with your palm facing the batsman.

To Bowl off Spin, roll the ball towards the leg side, by moving your index and middle fingers towards your third finger, as if you were squeezing a lemon.

Pitch the ball in line with the off stump so it spins into the leg stump.

To bowl leg spin, roll the ball towards the off side with your middle and index fingers moving towards your thumb, in a manney resembling the opposite of squeezing a lemon.

Try to pitch the ball in line with the leg stump, so that it spins towards the off stump.

Release the ball with enough flight in the delivery to keep the batsman guessing till the very last moment.

Try using the off spin as your stock delivery and introduce the leg spinning variation to deceive the batsman with an unexpected turn.

Keep practicing to perfect your spin.

Enjoy your game.

Cricket Tips and Tricks | Fielding

How to Catch the Ball

The three key steps are catching the ball with your fingers pointing up, down and sideways.

When you get a catch above your chest height, cup your hands with your fingers pointing up.

Place the thumb and forefinger of your dominant hand over the other hand to create a secure and large catching area.

Try to catch the ball at eye level with soft hands so it doesn’t bounce out of your grip.

When the ball arrives below chest height, cup your hands with your fingers pointing down.

Weave your little fingers, press the heels of your palms together, spread out your thumbs and bring your elbows closer together.

Bring your hands closer to your body as the ball gets close and absorb the catch with soft hands.

When receiving a high catch with a steep drop, try to get under the ball as quickly as possible and fix your gaze upon the ball all the way into your hands.

To take a flat catch moving outside the line of your body, point your fingers to the side.

Remember to stand on the balls of your feet with slightly bent knees, ready to move quickly in either direction.

Move your hands towards the ball so it lands into the center of your palms and wrap your fingers around it as soon as it lands.

Keep practising and expect a catch from every ball.

Enjoy your game.

How to Stop the Ball

The key steps are stopping, chasing and blocking the ball.

When the ball is hit in your direction, your first priority is to stop it in its path.

Attack the ball so you can get it into your hands sooner.

Bend your knees, get into a low and balanced position and collect the ball in front of your head.

Use the inside of the foot on the side of your throwing arm to back up your hands.

If the ball is moving fast or travelling through a bumpy patch, bring your knee down to the heel of the opposite leg and fence it safely with the long barrier.

Spread and point your fingers down and receive the ball with soft hands, bringing it up to your chest.

When the ball is rolling past you, chase after it and bend down to pick it up as soon as you catch up beside it.

If you’re right handed, slide to the right of the ball on the side of your left leg and hip.

Get onto your feet in a balanced position as quickly as you can, level your eyes and take aim to throw.

If the ball is headed wide of your position in the outfield, run to intersect it before it reaches the boundary and block it with the side of your foot if you have to.

Expect the ball to come to you every single time and keep practising your fielding.

Enjoy your game.

How to Throw the Ball

The key steps are throwing overarm, underarm and sidearm.

Grip it cross-seam with your first two fingers on top and thumb at the bottom so it doesn’t swing in the air.

For an overarm throw, get into a side-on position with your target and point your non throwing arm towards it with a straightened elbow.

Turn down the thumb of your throwing hand and raise the arm behind you with the elbow above shoulder level.

Lock your front leg as you transfer your weight onto it, creating a strong movement of the hips that brings your chest out to face the target.

Swing your throwing arm forward and let both arms follow through behind the hip opposite to the throwing arm.

To avoid throwing over the wicket keeper, try getting the ball to the wicket in one pitch.

Use a crow hop or a forward hopping motion to build up the lateral momentum of your body towards the target.

For a quicker release at close range, get into a side on position with the ball held behind your neck and whip the elbow up and back.

When the ball is collected at close proximity to the target just above ground level, you can throw it with your arm moving sideways across your body to the target.

From the infield, you can also throw the ball underarm to not waste any time, but make sure your throwing arm is straight at the elbow to keep the ball at stump height.

When attempting a direct hit, aim at the base of the stumps to focus your target area.

Keep practising throwing the ball with accuracy, control and power.

Enjoy your game.

How to Make a Run Out

The most important thing to consider in a run out situation is how quickly the ball can be returned to the wicket.

The key steps are throwing to the wicket keeper or bowler, aiming for a direct hit and backing up an overthrow.

As soon as you’ve fielded the ball, make a quick decision on which end you wish to throw the ball.

The keeper or bowler typically wait behind the stumps, expecting to receive the ball at around shoulder level.

If there are more chances of creating a dismissal on the striker’s end, throw the ball to the wicket keeper to initiate the run out.

If the batsman running towards the non-striker’s end is further from his crease, throw the ball to the bowler.

If there is no time, close fielders may aim the ball directly at the stumps at the risk of missing the wicket and giving the batsmen time to take more runs.

When batsmen under pressure take runs from missed deliveries, a wicket keeper may attempt a direct hit if they are standing far from the stumps.

If they are closer to the stumps than the batsman, it may be safer to outrun the batsman and hit the stump holding the ball.

To prevent losing more runs from overthrows, it is important for fielders to back up the player receiving the ball and respond quickly to prevent the loss of more runs.

Enjoy your game.

Learn the Basics of Wicketkeeping

The wicketkeeper is the most involved and busy player and stands behind the batsman’s wicket.

The three key steps are the position and stance, the footwork and the dismissals.

The keeper generally stands some distance away from the stumps for fast bowlers, to avoid bye runs.

For spinners, the keeper generally stands much closer, often measuring 2 steps from the stumps.

Position yourself slightly outside the off stump to see the ball clearly.

Make sure no part of your hands or body crosses the line of the stumps at the time of the delivery as this will lead to a no ball.

Bring your weight onto the balls of your feet placed shoulder’s width apart.

Bend your knees and crouch down and with a straight back, opening your palms to face the bowler, with the fingers pointing down.

Focus your gaze on the ball and start to rise with it as soon as it pitches, moving slightly outside of its line.

Lead with your head towards the line of the delivery, watching the ball all the way into your gloves and catch it below eye level.

When the delivery is to the leg side, shift quickly past the line of the ball with your right foot anchored on leg stump.

If the batsman is out of thier crease, shift your weight back onto your anchored foot and stump him by knocking the bails off.

If the ball is hit, be ready to catch the ball thrown by the fielder with the stumps in front of you so you don’t block a direct hit.

Catch the ball with both hands and take the bails off to run out a batsman.

For more information, you can check out the video on ‘how to execute a run out’ Enjoy your game.

Cricket Tips and Tricks Learning Video Link

Learn the Equipment Used for Battingkeyboard_arrow_down
Learn the Grip and Stancekeyboard_arrow_down
Learn the Backlift and Footworkkeyboard_arrow_down
How to Play a Front Foot Defencekeyboard_arrow_down
How to Play a Back Foot Defencekeyboard_arrow_down
How to Play a Straight Drivekeyboard_arrow_down
How to Play an Off Drivekeyboard_arrow_down
How to Play an On Drivekeyboard_arrow_down
How to Play a Cover Drivekeyboard_arrow_down
How to Play a Square Drivekeyboard_arrow_down
How to Play a Square Cutkeyboard_arrow_down
How to Play a Back Foot Punchkeyboard_arrow_down
How to Play a Late Cutkeyboard_arrow_down
How to Play a Leg Glancekeyboard_arrow_down
How to Play a Flick Shotkeyboard_arrow_down
How to Play a Pull Shotkeyboard_arrow_down
How to Play a Sweep Shotkeyboard_arrow_down
How to Play a Reverse Sweepkeyboard_arrow_down
How to Play a Lofted Shotkeyboard_arrow_down
The Different Ways to Get Outkeyboard_arrow_
IPL 2021 T20 International ODI International Test Matches IPL 2021

IPL 2021 has been scheduled tentatively between 11 April 2021 and 6 June 2021. The Indian Premier League is a professional Twenty20 cricket league in India usually contested between March and May of every year by eight teams representing eight different cities or states in India. The league was founded by the Board of Control for Cricket in India in 2007.

T20 International

Twenty20 International (T20I) is a form of cricket, played between two of the international members of the International Cricket Council (ICC), in which each team faces a maximum of twenty overs. The matches have top-class status and are the highest T20 standard.

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One Day International (ODI) is a form of limited overs cricket, played between two teams with international status, in which each team faces a fixed number of overs, currently 50 (used to be 60 overs until 1983), with the game lasting up to 8 hours

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Test cricket is the form of the sport of cricket with the longest match duration, and is considered the game’s highest standard. Rotary Test matches are played between national representative teams that have been granted Test status, as determined and conferred by the International Cricket Council (ICC)

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